Commanding the Environment or Green Dictatorships? Workshop at the University of Helsinki, 27-28 April 2017 – PHOTOS

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Workshop Program Available: Nature-Culture – Nature-Society Relationships in Authoritarian Regimes, Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki, 27-28 April 2017

27.4.2017 Thursday

9:00-9:10: Welcoming – Introducing the project and its members

9:10-10:40: Keynote Session:

Julija Lajus (Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg)

Richard Tucker (University of Michigan)

Pepijn van Eden (Université libre de Bruxelles)

10:50-12:20: Session 1: Nature conservation / nature management by the state

  • Nicolas Orsillo (Masaryk University, Prague, Czech Republic): State Nature Protection in Postwar Czechoslovakia: A Failed Transition from Nature Preservation to Environmental Protection
  • Micah Muscolino (University of Oxford, UK): Soil, Society, and the State in Shaanxi: Rethinking Environmental Management in Mao’s China
  • Muchaparara Musenwa (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa) The Political Economy of Zimbabwe’s Environmental Decline in a Time of Crisis, 1998-2015
  • Leonardo Valenzuela Perez (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) Crafting authoritarian atmospheres under Pinochet’s dictatorship

12:20-13:20: Lunch

13:20-14:45: Session 2: Eco-nationalism

  • Tetiana Perga (The Institute of the World History, National Academy of Science, Ukraine) Environmental opposition in Ukraine: forming, development, transforming (1986-2016)
  • Ludovit Hallon and Miroslav Sabol (Historical Institute, Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia) Slovakia’s economic and political development in the communist regime of the post 1948 Czechoslovakia and its environmental context
  • Andrei Dudchik (Belarusian State University): From social ecology to geopolitics: concepts ‘nature’ and ‘environment’ in contemporary Belarusian social sciences

14:45-15:10: Coffee

15:10-16:30: Session 3: Creating a new policy – new attitude

  • Aleksandra Kasatkina (Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, Saint Petersburg, Russia): Using the “green code” for cultivation a proper Soviet citizen in the city of Obninsk of the 1950-1970s
  • Daubravka Olsakova (Institute for Contemporary History, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic): ‘Functional Dog’: Communist Regimes and the Animal Turn
  • Shuxi Yin (Hefei University of Technology, China) Environmental Conflicts in Contemporary China. Actor, Action, and Network

18:00-20:30: Dinner  

 

28.4.2017 Friday

9:00-10:30 Keynote Session:

Jonathan Oldfield (University of Birmingham)

Jennifer Hoyt (Berry College, Georgia, US)

Stephen Brian (Mississippi State University)

10:45-12:15 Session 4: Scientists and professionals vs. politics

  • Elena Kochetkova (Higher School of Economics, Saint Petersburg, Russia): Water as Sacrifice? Industrial Water Treatment and Engineers in the USSR, 1940s-1960s
  • Michel Dupuy (Institut d’Histoire Moderne et Contemporaine, Paris, France): Pollution and public space in GDR (1949-1990)
  • Niccolo Piancida (Lingnan University, Hong Kong): The Great Caspian Fish Massacre: Scientists, Politics, and the Soviet Environmental Transition during the “Long 1960s” (1959-1974)

12:15-13:15: Lunch

13:15-14:45 Session 5: Forest policies

  • Chris Reed (Iowa State University) Sino-Silviculture: Unintended Consequences of State-sponsored Deforestation Initiatives in Western China
  • Adrian Zarrilli (Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Argentina) To the Conquest of “El Impenetrable” in the Gran Chaco Argentino. Politics and Environment in the Last Argentine Dictatorship (1976-1983)
  • Tony Andersson (New York University, USA) Counterinsurgent Environmentalism: Rainforest Conservation, Military State Building, and the Cold War in Northern Guatemala
  • Onur Inal (University of Hamburg, Germany) and Viktor Pál (University of Tampere) Politicization of the Urban Natural Environment in Turkey and Hungary: Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues

14:45-15:15: Coffee

15:15-16:45: Session 6: Water management

  • Jesse Hirvelä, Juri Huuhtanen, Simo Laakkonen (University of Turku, Finland) Red Waves: Developments of Water Protection in the Soviet Union, 1917-1991
  • Jiri Janac (Centre of the History of Sciences and Humanities, Czech Academy of Sciences): Co-construction of water and socialist dictatorship: the case of Czechoslovakia 1948-1989
  • Fernanda De Souza Braga (Leiden University, Netherlands – UNESCO-IHE): Analysis of the construction and legitimization of large dams during the civil-military regime in Brazil (1964-1985)
  • Laurent Coumel (CERCEC, CNRS, Paris, France) A focus on sewage treatment in the late Soviet Union: the Moscow water supply case (1960-1980s)

16:45-17:15: Conclusive remarks and future collaboration   

 

YOUR ACTION IS NEEDED: CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY (CEU) IS IN DANGER

This is a special announcement. Following the one two days ago. Your action is needed to defend academic freedom in Eastern Europe. Please see further details and links below.

The Hungarian government has proposed amendments to the National Higher Education Law that would make it impossible for Central European University – and possibly other international institutions – to continue operations within the country.

These changes would endanger the academic freedom vital for CEU’s continued operation in Budapest and would strike a blow against the academic freedom that enables all universities to flourish.

It is time for friends, supporters, and educational and academic communities to defend our institution and the independence of higher education institutions around the globe.

https://www.ceu.edu/category/istandwithceu

awayPreliminary Program: Commanding the Environment or Green Dictatorships? Nature-Culture – Nature-Society Relationships in Authoritarian Regimes International Seminar at the Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki, 27-28 April 2017

27.4.2017 Thursday

9:00-9:10: Welcoming – Introducing the project and its members

9:10-10:40: Keynote Session:
Julija Lajus (Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg)
Richard Tucker (University of Michigan)
Pepijn van Eden (Université libre de Bruxelles)

10:50-12:20: Session 1: Nature conservation / nature management by the state
• Nicolas Orsillo (Masaryk University, Prague, Czech Republic): State Nature Protection in
Postwar Czechoslovakia: A Failed Transition from Nature Preservation to Environmental Protection
• Micah Muscolino (University of Oxford, UK): Soil, Society, and the State in Shaanxi:
Rethinking Environmental Management in Mao’s China
• Muchaparara Musemwa (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa)
The Political Economy of Zimbabwe’s Environmental Decline in a Time of Crisis, 1998-
2015
• Leonardo Valenzuela Perez (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) Crafting authoritarian
atmospheres under Pinochet’s dictatorship

12:20-13:20: Lunch

13:20-14:45: Session 2: Eco-nationalism
• Tetiana Perga (The Institute of the World History, National Academy of Science, Ukraine)
Environmental opposition in Ukraine: forming, development, transforming (1986-2016)
• Ludovit Hallon and Miroslav Sabol (Historical Institute, Academy of Sciences, Bratislava,
Slovakia) Slovakia’s economic and political development in the communist regime of the
post 1948 Czechoslovakia and its environmental context
• Andrei Dudchik (Belarusian State University): From social ecology to geopolitics:
concepts ‘nature’ and ‘environment’ in contemporary Belarusian social sciences

14:45-15:10: Coffee

15:10-16:30: Session 3: Creating a new policy – new attitude
• Aleksandra Kasatkina (Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, Saint
Petersburg, Russia): Using the “green code” for cultivation a proper Soviet citizen in the
city of Obninsk of the 1950-1970s
• Daubravka Olsakova (Institute for Contemporary History, Academy of Sciences of the
Czech Republic): ‘Functional Dog’: Communist Regimes and the Animal Turn
• Shuxi Yin (Hefei University of Technology, China) Environmental Conflicts in
Contemporary China. Actor, Action, and Network

18:00-20:30: Dinner

 

28.4.2017 Friday

9:00-10:30 Keynote Session:
Jonathan Oldfield (University of Birmingham)
Jennifer Hoyt (Berry College, Georgia, US)
Stephen Brain (Mississippi State University)

10:45-12:15 Session 4: Scientists and professionals vs. politics
• Elena Kochetkova (Higher School of Economics, Saint Petersburg, Russia): Water as
Sacrifice? Industrial Water Treatment and Engineers in the USSR, 1940s-1960s
• Michel Dupuy (Institut d’Histoire Moderne et Contemporaine, Paris, France): Pollution and
public space in GDR (1949-1990)
• Niccolo Piancida (Lingnan University, Hong Kong): The Great Caspian Fish Massacre:
Scientists, Politics, and the Soviet Environmental Transition during the “Long 1960s”
(1959-1974)

12:15-13:15: Lunch

13:15-14:45 Session 5: Forest policies
• Chris Reed (Iowa State University) Sino-Silviculture: Unintended Consequences of
State-sponsored Deforestation Initiatives in Western China
• Adrian Zarrilli (Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Argentina) To the Conquest of “El
Impenetrable” in the Gran Chaco Argentino. Politics and Environment in the Last
Argentine Dictatorship (1976-1983)
• Tony Andersson (New York University, USA) Counterinsurgent Environmentalism:
Rainforest Conservation, Military State Building, and the Cold War in Northern
Guatemala
• Onur Inal (University of Hamburg, Germany) and Viktor Pál (University of Tampere)
Politicization of the Urban Natural Environment in Turkey and Hungary: Historical
Roots of Contemporary Issues

14:45-15:15: Coffee

15:15-16:45: Session 6: Water management
• Jesse Hirvelä, Juri Huuhtanen, Simo Laakkonen (University of Turku, Finland) Red
Waves: Developments of Water Protection in the Soviet Union, 1917-1991
• Jiri Janac (Centre of the History of Sciences and Humanities, Czech Academy of
Sciences): Co-construction of water and socialist dictatorship: the case of Czechoslovakia
1948-1989
• Fernanda De Souza Braga (Leiden University, Netherlands – UNESCO-IHE): Analysis of
the construction and legitimization of large dams during the civil-military regime in Brazil
(1964-1985)
• Laurent Coumel (CERCEC, CNRS, Paris, France) A focus on sewage treatment in the
late Soviet Union: the Moscow water supply case (1960-1980s)

16:45-17:45: Conclusive remarks and future collaboration

Technology, natural resources and crises in the past and present of Europe and beyond Proposal and Call for papers

Technology, natural resources and crises in the past and present of Europe and beyond

Proposal and Call for papers
a) For a session at the Tensions of Europe conference in Athens (7-10 September 2017) and
b) For a workshop in Aarhus in spring 2017 (dates to be determined per Doodle

There are many examples in historywhere the overexploitation of resources led to depletion and pollution and caused societal, environmental and technological crises. Yet, there is no comprehensive discussion how societies responded to resource crises,how they perceived and framed these crises, formed and pursued strategies of relief, changed patterns of resource exploitation, ‘constructed’ new resources (such as physical or rhetorical substitutes), employed new geopolitical policies (from securing foreign resources to waging wars)and developed new technologies (such as technologies increasing resource availability or efficiency) to overcome crises.

The aim of this project is to examine connections between resources, crises and technology in Europe or in European engagementsbeyond Europe in the 16thto 21st centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the circulation of technologies, knowledge and ideas within Europe and from or to Europe, which are related to resource crises. This includes circulation processes within individual countries (e.g. between centers and periphery), in between European countries (e.g. East-West and North-South) and between Europe and other continents (e.g. with European colonies). With this approach we propose to discuss the crossroads betweenthe history of technology, environmental history, and the history of exploitation of natural resources in a longue-durée perspective with the help of individual case studies.

Major questions to be asked are:
• How was technology used by European states, scientists, local communities and other actors as a tool to explore, excavate, transform and use natural resources? What impact did it have on changing patterns of resource use?
• How did actual or perceived resource crises support the development and application of technologies and the exploration of new resources and new territories?
• Which geopolitical implications did resource needs and perceptions and visions of resources in Europe have beyond Europe?
• How did perceptions and visions of resources and the relations of society, technology and resources change over time in European societies and institutions?
• How did technology contribute to conceptions ofdevelopment and sustainability and the emergence of forestry and water politics, agricultural development, biofuelsand green technologies?

Studying and utilizing natural resources are widely recognized as pressing issues for contemporary Europe and, more broadly, on a global scale. Historical research will shed light on the implications of the construction of (natural or virtual) objects as resources, the peculiarities of the interrelationship between societies, resources and technologies, and conceptions of resources and how they change in time and in different historical periods.

Fields for historical case studies include:
• Mineral resources (their excavation, technology, environmental effects, roles within economic crises);
• Water resources, including colonial and post-colonial technological projects of European countries: hydropower stations, water resources in cities;
• Fisheries on global and local levels, the question of commons in oceanic fisheries, the interplay of technological and climatic influences on fisheries;
• Exploitation and conservationof forest resources,alternative resources, use of wood wastes.

One specific goal of the project proposal is to continue and consolidate a research network on resources within the Tensions of Europe Network. The workshop in Arhus in the Spring 2017 and the session at the 8thToE conference in Athens (7-10 September 2017) along with further events serve to prepare collaborative publications (special issues) and research projects. The date for a workshop in Aarhus will be settled per Doodle. There will be some funding for the workshop in Aarhus available for early career researchers, but no special funding for participants of the session at the 8thToE conference (please, check the webpage of the conference for information about funding).

Applications should include a title, short abstract, the academic title and affiliation of the applicant(s) and a short bio. Please name your file with your surname. Abstracts should be no more than 150 words of the individual papers.

If you are interested in applying, please, send your application to len.kochetkova@gmail.com with a copy to matthias.heymann@css.au.dk by 11 February 2017.

In your application, indicate if you are applying for 1) a session at the 8thToE conference in Athens (7-10 September 2017), 2) a workshop in Aarhus (Spring 2017), 3) or both.

Call for Papers: Commanding the Environment or Green Dictatorships? Nature-Culture – Nature-Society Relationships in Authoritarian Regimes International Seminar at the Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki, 27-28 April 2017

The Jean Monnet Team of the Aleksanteri Institute (the Finnish Centre of Russian and East European Studies) at the University of Helsinki will hold an international seminar 27-28 April 2017.

The two-day seminar offers an interdisciplinary initiative to study the evolution of authoritarian systems through the prism of how these regimes relate to their physical environment. There is a general assumption that, in comparison with liberal democratic systems, authoritarian regimes have less concern for nature preservation as they have less apprehension about their citizens’ wellbeing. There is, however, a globally rising awareness of the declining state of the environment (climate change, pollution, resource depletion, overpopulation) that endangers the existence of any human political system. Authoritarian leaders have begun to show more and more interest in global discussions and processes aiming to find joint solutions to the fast deteriorating physical environment. Simultaneously, there is a growing social consciousness and flow of information generating civic activism with an environmental agenda. Taking into consideration this complex context, the seminar aims to investigate the nature-culture and nature-society relationship of any modern authoritarian regime.

We approach this topic with the following questions in mind. How do contemporary authoritarian regimes’ attitudes to environment differ from any authoritarian states in the past? How do authoritarian regimes construct and modify their attitudes, rhetoric and policies towards nature and environment?  What can a careful interdisciplinary and comparative analysis of the changes in culture-nature/ society-nature relations in an authoritarian regime reveal of the evolutionary phase of the authoritarian system itself?

The organizers suggest the following sub-themes for consideration in relation to the natural environment in authoritarian regimes:

  • Perception of the environment: ideology, rhetoric, politics, culture and education
  • Environmental management: change and continuity
  • Civic response and power dynamics: actors, networks, action-models
  • Pressures of the spatial context: international – regional – national – local perspectives

 

Confirmed speakers include:

Stephen Brain (Mississippi State University)

Pepijn van Eeden (Université libre de Bruxelles)

Julia Lajus (Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg)

Jonathan Oldfield (University of Birmingham)

Richard Tucker (University of Michigan)

 

The aim is to publish two edited international volumes based on the outcome of the seminar.

 

Abstracts for individual papers (max. 300 words) with short cv (max. 200 words): February 10, 2017
Notification of acceptance: February 17, 2017.

Please, send the abstracts to katalin.miklossy(at)helsinki.fi

The program will be announced 28 February, 2017.

Participants are requested to make their own arrangements for travel although a limited number of travel grants are available for young academics based in overseas institutions. The accepted speakers will be offered financial support for accommodation and meals. There is no registration fee. The seminar is free for the audience.